Skip to Main Content
It looks like you're using Internet Explorer 11 or older. This website works best with modern browsers such as the latest versions of Chrome, Firefox, Safari, and Edge. If you continue with this browser, you may see unexpected results.

ENGL 1102 Graphic Novels: Sources: Reading and Writing

Reading a Scholarly Article: Basics

Reading a scholarly article effectively is quite different than how you would read a novel. Most novels are intended to be read as a whole, front to back. Scholarly articles on the other hand are meant to be dissected like a pie into many different pieces, such as an Abstract, Discussion or Methods section. Skipping around in a novel would be a little confusing, but it's encouraged when reading a scholarly article. 

Arrow with Novel inside it. Signifies the linear aspect of reading novels.

 

Parts of a Scholarly Article - There is a pie with different sections including Title, Abstract, Introduction, Methods, Results, Discussion, Conclusions, References.

Writing Using Scholarly Sources

When it's your turn to write a paper, you'll probably want to include some sources to support your argument or thesis. 

 

There are three main tools in your "incorporating sources" toolkit:

 

  1. Quotations 
  2. Paraphrases 
  3. Summaries 

 

Just like when you're selecting other tools in everyday life, what you're trying to accomplish will determine what tool you'll use. 

Reading a Scholarly Article

Title 

A brief description of the scholarly article in the form of a title. It should at least give you a general idea about what the article is about. 

 

Abstract 

 A preview of the scholarly article. It should address the purpose, method and results that will be found in the article. 

 

Introduction 

Describes the purpose of the scholarly article. May provide an overview of the field and previous research in the form of a Literature Review. 

 

Methods 

Describes how the research and what type of research was conducted. 

 

Results 

Presents the outcome of the research. 

 

Discussion 

Analyzes the results to determine what potential impact it could have on the scholarly field or community. 

 

Conclusion 

Reiterates points made throughout the article, including potential for further research. 

 

References 

Works cited throughout the scholarly article by the author. The list should contain all the relevant information needed for you to find the resource for yourself. 

Jump Around

 It's okay to skip around in a scholarly article. If the article looks to be useful for your purposes then you can read it from the beginning to end. 

 

Keep It Strategic

While you are reading, reflect on how the article relates to what you want to write about or research. ​​ 

 

Mark It Up

​​Take notes. Interact with the article. How do the ideas or information presented relate to what you want to write about?

 

Replay​

If the article is relevant after you've read through it, consider reading it again. 

 

Find the Source 

​References can be a very useful resource. Be sure to skim the titles in the References section. You could find another scholarly article you want to read. 

Dasgupta, A. (2013). Undergraduate research, part I: Reading scholarly articles. The Reference Librarian54, 177-180. 

Incorporating Sources Toolkit

A direct quotation removed from an existing source with tweezers. The tweezers represent the precise nature involved when using direct quotations.

Characteristics of Quotations

  • Precise (Have to be the exact words of the author)
  • Usually short
  • Quoted material is enclosed in quotation marks ("")
  • Credits the author
  • Followed by parenthesis that contain the page number

 

Reading 

 

As you read a potential source, identify brief quotations that concisely support or address your argument or thesis. Be sure to make a note of the page number. 

 

Writing/Citing

 

When you include a quotation in your writing, you will need to place the quoted material in quotes and include the author's name and the page number. 

  • The author's name may appear in the text of your paper or before the page number in parenthesis. 

 

Examples: 

  • According to [Author's First and Last Name], "this research guide is very helpful" (Page Number). 
  • "This research guide is very helpful" (Author's Last Name Page Number).

 

Several ideas are represented in a scholarly paper as fish. A net is used to collect most of those ideas/fish. This is an example of paraphrasing as it's not as precise as direct quotations.

 

Characteristics of Paraphrases

  • Expresses ideas in your own words
  • Credits the author
  • Followed by parenthesis that contain the page number
  • Multiple sources can be paraphrased at one time

 

Reading

As you read a potential source, highlight sections that convey the main ideas or points of the paper. Practice writing the main ideas of these sections in your own words. Make a note of the page number.  

 

Writing/Citing

When you include a paraphrase in your writing, you will need to include the paraphrased section (in your own words) and include the author's name and the page number. 

  • The author's name may appear in the text of your paper or before the page number in parenthesis. 
  • Your paraphrased section of text can refer to more than source. If you use this format, you will want to include the authors' names before the page number in the parenthesis. Each source would be separated by a semicolon.

Example: (Last Name Page Number; Last Name Page Number). 

 

Examples: 

Original: This research guide was designed for a variety of reasons. In addition to demonstrating how to find sources at Odum Library, it also goes into evaluating sources to determine their credibility. Other pages of this guide explore the differences between quoting, paraphrasing and summarizing.

 

  • According to [Author's First and Last Name], this research guide could be used to help students determine what sources are credible as well as how to quote and paraphrase material (Page Number). 
  • This research guide could be used to help students determine what sources are credible as well as how to quote and paraphrase material (Author's Last Name Page Number).

Example of summaries, a clamp is used to condense an entire page of information into a small section.

 

 

Characteristics of Summaries

  • Expresses ideas in your own words
  • Focuses only on the main ideas 
  • Credits the author
  • More general than paraphrases
  • Significantly shorter than original text

 

Reading 

As you read, try identifying the main ideas of the source. Once you finish reading, try to compose a short statement that provides an overview of the entire source. 

 

Writing/Citing

When you include a summary in your writing, you will need to include the summarized section (in your own words) and include the author's name. 

  • The author's name may appear in the text of your paper or in parenthesis. 

 

Original: This research guide was designed for a variety of reasons. In addition to demonstrating how to find sources at Odum Library, it also goes into evaluating sources to determine their credibility. Other pages of this guide explore the differences between quoting, paraphrasing and summarizing.

  • According to [Author's First and Last Name], the research guide was created to teach students many information literacy skills.  
  • The research guide was created to teach students many information literacy skills (Author's Last Name).